Unusual British Livestock | Livestock

UK farmers are discovering some new and interesting alternatives to traditional livestock as they seek more diverse ways to make a living.Ostrich
Ostrich was first introduced to the UK in the late 1980′s, as a low fat alternative to beef, farms can now be found all over Britain. Ostrich produce includes leather, feathers and oil, as well as the meat – which is not only incredibly low in fat but also low in calories – as a red meat it’s great for steaks, frying and burgers.Llama
Whilst llamas are not kept or bred for their meat – the llama is a popular livestock choice for farmers who are looking to cash in on the textile trade with the soft and naturally lanolin free wool. During the 1980′s in North America llamas were introduced to farms as livestock guards for herds such as sheep and goats and today in the UK farmers are also adopting this practice.Water Buffalo
A number of UK farms in Hampshire have turned to Buffalo, as a unique alternative to both dairy and beef, producing and selling the meat, skins and cheese. Buffalo meat is tender and tasty, contains very little fat and has been proved to have very low cholesterol content – another healthy alternative to red meat.Wild Boar
Wild boar became extinct in the UK over 700 years ago, but a recent reintroduction on private land has seen the species accidentally reintroduced into the wild once again – a very rare occurrence on our little isle. The meat has been described as ‘beef with crackling’; it has a sweet flavour with gamey undertones and is rosy in colour.Crocodile
Whilst crocodile has been a fairly common part of the Australian and African diet for years, there’s just one crocodile farm in Europe and that is here in the UK. Located in Cambridgeshire the farm supplies both skin and meat, which has been likened to chicken and monkfish.Kangaroo
Not just an alternative to traditional livestock, kangaroo farming is a pledge to fighting climate change as they don’t emit methane. Kangaroo farms are a rare occurrence in the UK but producers in the South East have found keen buyers of the meat, which is lean, low in fat, high in protein, and is perfect for use as steaks, minced meat and ‘kanga bangas’ (kangaroo sausages).

Business Continuity and Healthcare Disaster Planning | Healthcare

The Business Continuity profession has seen rapid and explosive growth in the days since 9/11. On that terrible day, the significant difference between those businesses housed in the World Trade Centers that would reopen and those that would close was the degree of business process resilience that business possessed.The years since 9/11 have seen businesses large and small implementing not only data redundancy, but continuity planning for all critical business processes. To be sure, healthcare has also implemented data redundancy and business process continuity planning for business and administrative activities, but what about the true business of healthcare?Business continuity planning is designed to preserve those critical business processes that must be preserved to maintain operations and profitability. For an investment company, those processes include data storage, client accounting and real time financial processing to mention just a few. Healthcare business contingency planning is directed at supporting such processes as data storage, client accounting and real time financial processing; but does this support the mission of healthcare?An investment company is in the business of managing money and markets; their business continuity planning supports that mission. Healthcare is in the business of delivering medical care. Currently healthcare business continuity is split between two professionals, the business continuity professional and the medical contingency planner/safety officer. The business continuity professional is charged with ensuring that the financial and administrative processes of the healthcare business are maintained. The Medical contingency planner/safety officer is charged with ensuring that the delivery of healthcare continues uninterrupted. But the does this split approach support the mission of healthcare?Healthcare business continuity planning must preserve those critical business processes required to maintain operations and profitability. This by necessity includes both critical medical services and critical financial and administrative processes. However, most healthcare institutions in the United States are private sector businesses. These businesses do not meet their operational budgets with emergency medical services or even general hospital admissions. This was borne out in the late 1970′s and early 1980′s when the losses in emergency medical services caused hospitals to either close or restrict services in the emergency room. In an effort to stop this trend, Congress passed the 1986 Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA). In 2007, healthcare institutions subsidize the unfunded EMTALA mandate with outpatient services. These are the very services that most medical contingency planners/safety officers close when disaster strikes.Like business contingency planning, healthcare disaster planning begins with a vulnerability analysis; however, unlike the business vulnerability analysis which focuses on identifying critical business processes, the healthcare vulnerability analysis focuses on quantitating external threats. Healthcare disaster planning is based on an “All Hazards” approach. Despite the apparent emphasis on external threats, an “All Hazards” approach is meant to be “Process Hazards” approach. Here in is the challenge for the medical contingency planner/safety officer and the new market opportunity for the business continuity professional.Healthcare desperately needs a planning professional who can combine the healthcare vulnerability analysis with the business process vulnerability analysis. The average daily revenue loss for a hospital that closes outpatient services following a disaster is a quarter of a million dollars. In addition, financial losses occur as a result of process failures in registration, charge entry and billing. The delivery of healthcare services frequently suffers as a result of process failures during disaster that cause a backlog of patients and a loss of efficiency. Healthcare disaster planning based on standard healthcare vulnerability analysis combined with process vulnerability analysis would not only address the business process continuity, but would highlight medical process vulnerabilities allowing limited medical resources to be concentrated on medical process continuity. Finally an attention to business continuity focusing on the primary mission of the healthcare institution to deliver healthcare and maintain profitability would support the business processes and the medical processes while quickly returning to normal operations to restore all streams of revenue.